Newly discovered rock paintings in central India showing honey collection

publication date: Nov 30, 2011
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Bee World Vol.65 (3) 1984 pp. 121-126
Article Title

Newly discovered rock paintings in central India showing honey collection

Author(s)

Yashodhar Mathpal

Abstract

Central India is the richest zone of Indian rock paintings. These paintings-some of which date back to the Mesolithic stage-illustrate daily life scenes and activities of the people living in prehistoric and later periods in that part of the country. Hunting  was a main activity and, among daily life scenes, the hunting of game animals is the prime theme of prehistoric paintings. On the other hand, paintings of the historic period depict mainly bands of marching and fighting soldiers and horsemen.  Foraging-the collection of fruits, tubers, eggs, small animals and honey-was the second main activity in the preagriculture stage. There are, therefore, many eye-catching scenes of fruit and honey collection, animal and bird trapping, and fishing. Overhangs of sandstone rock in forest-clad hills of Central India still harbour many colonies of the large rock bee, Apis dorsata, and some of these hills are named after honey and bees, e.g., Bhonrawali, Shahadkarad, Bee-nala, Meghupeep.

Keywordsrock paintings, India, Apis dorsata
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